Chip poker

This article needs additional citations for verification. Chips from the fictional “Casino de Isthmus City”. chip poker,000 Malagasy franc gaming plaque from Grand Cercle casino, Antananarivo, Madagascar, circa 1995.

Plaques differ from chips in that they are larger, usually rectangular in shape and contain serial numbers. This section does not cite any sources. Money is exchanged for tokens in a casino at the casino cage, at the gaming tables, or at a cashier station. The tokens are interchangeable with money at the casino. Tokens are employed for several reasons.

Because of the uniform size, shape, and patterns of stacks of chips, they are easier to tally compared to currency. This attribute also enables the pit boss or security to quickly verify the amount being paid, reducing the chance that a dealer might incorrectly pay a customer. A standard 300 piece set of Plastic Injection chips often sold as “clay composite” chips. Casino chip collecting is a part of numismatics, more specifically as specialized exonumia collecting.

Gaming Tokens Collectors Club formed in 1988. The ancestors of the modern casino token were the counters used to keep score in the card games Ombre and Quadrille. In 1752, French Quadrille sets contained a number of different counters, known as jetons, fiches and mils. In the early history of Poker during the 19th century, players seemed to use any small valuable object imaginable.

Early poker players sometimes used jagged gold pieces, gold nuggets, gold dust, or coins as well as “chips” primarily made of ivory, bone, wood, paper, and a composition made from clay and shellac. Several companies between the 1880s and the late 1930s made clay composition poker chips. There were over 1000 designs from which to choose. Authentic clay chip manufactured for home use. 1 chip from Treasure Island, Las Vegas, NV. The vast majority of authentic casino chips are “clay” chips but can be more accurately described as compression molded chips. Modern clay chips are a composition of materials more durable than clay alone.

The printed graphics on clay chips is called an inlay. Inlays are typically made of paper and are then clad with a plastic film applied to the chip prior to the compression molding process. During the molding process the inlay becomes permanently fastened to the chip and can not be removed from the chip without destroying the inlay. Ceramic chips were introduced in the mid 1980s as alternative to clay chips, and are also used in casinos, as well as being readily available to the home market. The ability to print lettering and graphics on the entire surface of the chip, instead of just the inlay, made them popular.

The chips used in North American casinos typically weigh about 10 grams, but are usually between 8 and 10. Classic Poker Chips, Palm Gaming International, Game On Chip Company and GTI Gaming. There is no universally standardized color scheme for poker chip values, and schemes not only vary nationally and regionally, but even from venue to venue, or by event type within a single venue. Common additional colors are pink, purple, yellow, orange, and grey. Newer designs in home chips include three-color designs where a three-step molding process creates a chip with unique base, secondary, and detail colors. In casinos, uniform chip colors and sizes are sometimes specified by the local gaming control board for consistency.